Scissors

The young man walked in torn shattered robes. He wore no sandals or shoes to protect his feet.  The sun blazed on his skin as he walked aimlessly to his next destination.  He didn’t know where he was going, what he was going to do.  So far nothing had worked.  His life was still unfolding in ways he didn’t know or understand.  His robes once bright and colorful now were drained of color. They seemed to lead him on his journey.  They went with him everywhere as he refused to remove them or mend the broken threads.

The young man had visions, nightmares, and so to forget them he drank and drugged to cloud the pictures that came into his mind even in the daylight.  He tired and sat on a hill overlooking the canyon.  There he tried to rest his aching bones, and in the silence he reclaimed memories of his younger years. The abuse  replayed itself over and over in his mind..  He looked at the sun setting and cried tears that dripped down his face on to his robes.  He screamed and yelled hoping the echoes in his mind would be released over the expanse before him.

A whisper came back to him.  “Scissors” the Whisper said.  “It is scissors you need.”

He tried to ignore the Whisper and place it behind him as he turned his back to the canyon.

“Scissors!” the Whisper called- this time in a deeper tone.

“What the f?” the young man thought aloud.

“Take the scissors and cut the robe.”

Now the young man answered the voice that was starting to bellow out of the Whisper.  “What the hell are you talking, man?”

A warm breeze brushed against his face.  “We all wear a robe of textures and patterns. It should keep moving and changing, but in yours I see no movement, no change other than becoming more tattered.  Our robes are our protection, but only if we keep changing the pattern and the pieces over time.  In yours I see nothing new. It’s worn, stagnant with colors that have faded over time.  It is becoming thin, and less protective of you, but yet you do nothing about it.”

The young man looked down at his robe.  He couldn’t change what he had always known.  The Whisper was asking too much.   How could he let go of something that once protected him?  To change it would mean he would have to change himself and who the person he identified himself to be.

Again, the Whisper spoke  to the man.  “The robe no longer fits you.  It is the robe of your past and only a symbol of how you see yourself.  You are not the abuse.  You need not wear it like a shield to keep all good things from your life.  Take the scissors.  Cut out the bad parts and be done with them.  They are of the past and you are of the present. Make your present light.”

The man picked up the scissors.  His hands shook as he began to cut.  He held the tattered piece in his hand. He wiped the tears streaming down his face.

“Now, the Whisper said, ‘ let it fly to the wind.  Release it, and when you do, a new piece will come in its place.  You have only to dream it; see it as a possibility of beauty and happiness ready to piece together your life.”

The young man did as he was told.  As he cut away the old, he felt light, free.

“Now, look at the hem.  Sometimes we trip in its hem and it throws us back, but other times we trip forward.  The trip forward pushes us towards something better or different than we are used to.  You hem is still sewn.  It has stayed in one piece never moving forward or backward.  You can decide what you do with it.  You have the choice.  You are the wearer.  It doesn’t wear you, just like the abuse doesn’t wear you or define you.”

The young man was beginning to understand.  The scissors cut and cut out the old, and were replaced with new textures and colors.  He was ready to move forward.

The Whisper said, “Very good. Remember the past no longer exists.  Only now, the present is where you are.  You have released the past.  Now you can move forward, one minute at a time, one step at a time, one lovely day at a time.  You have choices to make.  Make your choices shine like the sun on your face. Keep changing your robe when life gives you tattered pieces. Don’t hold on it so tight that you can’t trip on the hem.”

We have all been abused by others or ourselves.  Take out your scissors and make a new robe.  You aren’t the abuse.  You are a wonderful human being who needs to love and give love.  Shape your robe for the present.  Don’t hesitate to move forward into a powerful life.

If you have a story to tell or have a comment to make, please write in the comment box or email me directly.

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Listen to Your Voice and Be Aware

“We don’t receive wisdom; we must discover it for ourselves.”— Marcel Proust

I admit it. I still miss him. I probably always will, but I don’t see that as a bad thing.  I do know that all the good that is in him I will look for in another man, and all the bad in him I will avoid like the plague.  I learned a lot from his being gone. I learned about being me. I learned what I want and don’t want in a relationship. I learned that I can survive without him in my life, albeit that was a battle I fought for a long time. I learned to surrender my situation to the universe and just let go of the what if’s and could have beens.  As I said in my previous post, being alone has rendered me my own salvation.  I have had to learn so many things– especially making good decisions in several areas of my life.

Emotional and Rational Decision Making

Every choice in life is a battle between the rational and emotional way of thinking and feeling.  In most cases our ego is the little voice in our heads that tell us what to do.  Sometimes its good to listen to that inner voice, but other times, for example, when we listen to that ego tell us, “Buy the shoes, forget the electric bill” our rational thinking must kick in.  Ouch!  That isn’t always the fun thing to do, but it is the best decision for the moment.  An emotional decision can create al response within us we may regret later.

Examples of Negative Emotional Decisions

  • Bad relationships– Wow, the guy was cute, but what a jerk!  Use your own past experience in relationships to guide you to form good , healthy relationships.  This isn’t easy to do.  We all seem to return back to what we are used to, but remind yourself why he was a jerk and what he did to cause you pain and suffering and then just let him go! It’s never too late to look for a better “Mr. Right.”
  • Poor Spending Decisions– Oh the ego loves this one.  The ego wants to feel loved or justified in spending to make itself feel better.  Be wise about this.  Take time to make rational decisions.  Impulse buyers or compulsive buyers, gamblers or examples of falling into this emotional trap.
  • Instant self-gratification– We are all subject to this type of behavior.  Sometimes it can be good to “just let go” as long as it doesn’t affect negatively in an area of your life that can’t afford to take a beating.

I know as you read this you are thinking that’s a bit over-simplified, and perhaps it is, but I have also learned that I have to be more aware of the moment, and how the decision I am making can affect me this afternoon or tomorrow or in the future.  I am not saying that every decision should be weighed and measured, but using your past experience as a guideline to good decision making can make your life a lot easier.  Remember the best decisions make you feel better- not just for the moment, but in the long term.   

So What Can We Do to Help Ourselves  Reach Good  Choices?

Know your goal!   Too many choices aren’t good.   Eliminate so many choices that can confuse, but think about the choices that you can or will use. Take your time, and don’t use a bad mood or a stressful situation make the decision for you.  That’s your ego talking.  Wake up and be aware.    Listen to yourself, your ego.  Ask if  it is  hurting you or helping you to make a rational decision. According to Barry Schwartz, PhD., a psychologist and professor of social theory at Swarthmore College, and the author The Paradox Choice, he says,” To improve the odds of reaching decisions we feel good about, we need to reduce the options to a more manageable number.”   Goal setting is important to reaching good decisions.  Be aware of how your reaching your goal makes you feel, and use it for future decision making.

I’m not trying to judge, or lecture, but give some helpful tips for those of us , including myself , to make good choices.  I am still learning, and I hope to always learn to be more aware of me and what my needs are and the best way to achieve them.  Now my little voice in my head is saying,  go out to lunch, let me check my wallet!


Listen to Your Voice and Be Aware

“We don’t receive wisdom; we must discover it for ourselves.”— Marcel Proust

I admit it. I still miss him. I probably always will, but I don’t see that as a bad thing.  I do know that all the good that is in him I will look for in another man, and all the bad in him I will avoid like the plague.  I learned a lot from his being gone. I learned about being me. I learned what I want and don’t want in a relationship. I learned that I can survive without him in my life, albeit that was a battle I fought for a long time. I learned to surrender my situation to the universe and just let go of the what if’s and could have beens.  As I said in my previous post, being alone has rendered me my own salvation.  I have had to learn so many things– especially making good decisions in several areas of my life.

Emotional and Rational Decision Making

Every choice in life is a battle between the rational and emotional way of thinking and feeling.  In most cases our ego is the little voice in our heads that tell us what to do.  Sometimes its good to listen to that inner voice, but other times, for example, when we listen to that ego tell us, “Buy the shoes, forget the electric bill” our rational thinking must kick in.  Ouch!  That isn’t always the fun thing to do, but it is the best decision for the moment.  An emotional decision can create al response within us we may regret later.

Examples of Negative Emotional Decisions

  • Bad relationships– Wow, the guy was cute, but what a jerk!  Use your own past experience in relationships to guide you to form good , healthy relationships.  This isn’t easy to do.  We all seem to return back to what we are used to, but remind yourself why he was a jerk and what he did to cause you pain and suffering and then just let him go! It’s never too late to look for a better “Mr. Right.”
  • Poor Spending Decisions– Oh the ego loves this one.  The ego wants to feel loved or justified in spending to make itself feel better.  Be wise about this.  Take time to make rational decisions.  Impulse buyers or compulsive buyers, gamblers or examples of falling into this emotional trap.
  • Instant self-gratification– We are all subject to this type of behavior.  Sometimes it can be good to “just let go” as long as it doesn’t affect negatively in an area of your life that can’t afford to take a beating.

I know as you read this you are thinking that’s a bit over-simplified, and perhaps it is, but I have also learned that I have to be more aware of the moment, and how the decision I am making can affect me this afternoon or tomorrow or in the future.  I am not saying that every decision should be weighed and measured, but using your past experience as a guideline to good decision making can make your life a lot easier.  Remember the best decisions make you feel better- not just for the moment, but in the long term.   

So What Can We Do to Help Ourselves  Reach Good  Choices?

Know your goal!   Too many choices aren’t good.   Eliminate so many choices that can confuse, but think about the choices that you can or will use. Take your time, and don’t use a bad mood or a stressful situation make the decision for you.  That’s your ego talking.  Wake up and be aware.    Listen to yourself, your ego.  Ask if  it is  hurting you or helping you to make a rational decision. According to Barry Schwartz, PhD., a psychologist and professor of social theory at Swarthmore College, and the author The Paradox Choice, he says,” To improve the odds of reaching decisions we feel good about, we need to reduce the options to a more manageable number.”   Goal setting is important to reaching good decisions.  Be aware of how your reaching your goal makes you feel, and use it for future decision making.

I’m not trying to judge, or lecture, but give some helpful tips for those of us , including myself , to make good choices.  I am still learning, and I hope to always learn to be more aware of me and what my needs are and the best way to achieve them.  Now my little voice in my head is saying,  go out to lunch, let me check my wallet!


Keep on Rockin’ and Empower Yourself

Rockin’– hard, punk, new and awesome.  I’m moving forward, attempting to  knock my reader’s socks off their toes, but first I have to know who my readers are!  Until now they have been fellow writers, but in this blog, I am attempting to meet new demands and topics that will open the abyss to any topic that can give a  sense of awesome, comfort and interest.  First I must tell you about myself.

I have not written anything too personal about myself, but now maybe it’s time.  This isn’t easy for me, as I have always reserved that right for my closest friends and family.  I hope to have a new family- people who share interests in all topics from cooking to sex.  I am a people person, and have worked as  an Empowerment Specialist for most of my adult life.   So what empowers me?

In the past year and a half I have learned a lot about myself.  The saying, “better late than never” really does apply to me.  I have gone through my life with blinders on, or cotton in my ears. I never listened to my own words I gave to others.  I saw, but I really didn’t see who I was as a person,.  I knew who I was as a mother, a wife, a friend. I thought I knew who I was until I was alone for the first time. I didn’t feel empowered at all.  I felt weak in just about every area of my personal self.

When my husband of sixteen years and I split, I found myself having to rely on me.  He did everything for me from fixing lawnmowers to fixing my computer.  I didn’t know or care to know anything about the mechanics of things and how they work.  I didn’t have to.  He was a fixer of all trades, so why should I worry, right? Hah!  My first blunder was not learning or paying attention to the details of how things  work.  My Mr. Fix-It was gone, and when I moved, so did my computer!  OMG, what an ordeal for me to plug it in and get it running with all its wires and add-ons.  My mind was crazy with “oh shit” remarks and “damn it’s”.  I was angry at him for leaving me in this lurch and feeling of total helplessness.  I blamed him for my stupidity.  Once the anger subsided, and I did get the computer working, I laughed and told myself that never again would I be so dependent on another person to fix my problems.  The reality was that my issues weren’t his fault, but mine.

The computer may be a minor detail to you, but for me it served as the catalyst to get myself together.   How did I make major decisions without consulting my best friend  – my ex- husband, when he was no longer available to me as a friend, a lover or anything?  On came the tears and the loneliness, and again I blamed him for my insecurities and difficult path to making decisions for myself. I missed that part of us, because we had always made decisions together.  Now I faced them alone.

Questions of where should I live, what could  I afford, worries about if my credit would  withstand the up-coming months of supporting myself  all came to me in waves  of despair and depression.  I nearly lost my business, my home, and my financial security.  I was a mess.  Life was not fair.  Life was not good.  I started going to a support group, and that turned me around.  I learned that if I sat back and looked at what I had done up to that point, I was  surviving.  I did make reasonable decisions on my own, and I could be a grownup.

In a few short months, I learned more about the computer, I had managed to keep my business afloat, I began writing again after several years of procrastination, I found a nice place to live, and managed to save my home we shared, and moved in after months of fighting for a home modification loan I could afford.  I did all these things without him.  I was beginning to feel pretty kick ass!

In the next few posts, I will be talking to you about empowering your life, and taking charge again of who you are.  Empowerment comes in many forms and in many ways.  I am interested in your story and how you overcame a weakness in an area in your life.

Keep on Rockin’ and Empower Yourself

Rockin’– hard, punk, new and awesome.  I’m moving forward, attempting to  knock my reader’s socks off their toes, but first I have to know who my readers are!  Until now they have been fellow writers, but in this blog, I am attempting to meet new demands and topics that will open the abyss to any topic that can give a  sense of awesome, comfort and interest.  First I must tell you about myself.

I have not written anything too personal about myself, but now maybe it’s time.  This isn’t easy for me, as I have always reserved that right for my closest friends and family.  I hope to have a new family- people who share interests in all topics from cooking to sex.  I am a people person, and have worked as  an Empowerment Specialist for most of my adult life.   So what empowers me?

In the past year and a half I have learned a lot about myself.  The saying, “better late than never” really does apply to me.  I have gone through my life with blinders on, or cotton in my ears. I never listened to my own words I gave to others.  I saw, but I really didn’t see who I was as a person,.  I knew who I was as a mother, a wife, a friend. I thought I knew who I was until I was alone for the first time. I didn’t feel empowered at all.  I felt weak in just about every area of my personal self.

When my husband of sixteen years and I split, I found myself having to rely on me.  He did everything for me from fixing lawnmowers to fixing my computer.  I didn’t know or care to know anything about the mechanics of things and how they work.  I didn’t have to.  He was a fixer of all trades, so why should I worry, right? Hah!  My first blunder was not learning or paying attention to the details of how things  work.  My Mr. Fix-It was gone, and when I moved, so did my computer!  OMG, what an ordeal for me to plug it in and get it running with all its wires and add-ons.  My mind was crazy with “oh shit” remarks and “damn it’s”.  I was angry at him for leaving me in this lurch and feeling of total helplessness.  I blamed him for my stupidity.  Once the anger subsided, and I did get the computer working, I laughed and told myself that never again would I be so dependent on another person to fix my problems.  The reality was that my issues weren’t his fault, but mine.

The computer may be a minor detail to you, but for me it served as the catalyst to get myself together.   How did I make major decisions without consulting my best friend  – my ex- husband, when he was no longer available to me as a friend, a lover or anything?  On came the tears and the loneliness, and again I blamed him for my insecurities and difficult path to making decisions for myself. I missed that part of us, because we had always made decisions together.  Now I faced them alone.

Questions of where should I live, what could  I afford, worries about if my credit would  withstand the up-coming months of supporting myself  all came to me in waves  of despair and depression.  I nearly lost my business, my home, and my financial security.  I was a mess.  Life was not fair.  Life was not good.  I started going to a support group, and that turned me around.  I learned that if I sat back and looked at what I had done up to that point, I was  surviving.  I did make reasonable decisions on my own, and I could be a grownup.

In a few short months, I learned more about the computer, I had managed to keep my business afloat, I began writing again after several years of procrastination, I found a nice place to live, and managed to save my home we shared, and moved in after months of fighting for a home modification loan I could afford.  I did all these things without him.  I was beginning to feel pretty kick ass!

In the next few posts, I will be talking to you about empowering your life, and taking charge again of who you are.  Empowerment comes in many forms and in many ways.  I am interested in your story and how you overcame a weakness in an area in your life.

Live in the Moment

Willy Sparrow has remained the same for years.  His life runs on a routine,  starting directly at 6:00 am.  He meditates on the swing,  listens carefully to the birds, the dogs barking down the block, the car engines starting to take their owners to their daily grind.  The swing sways with the breeze and he breathes in nature’s peace.  He loves to start his day with the warm sun on his back, or the crisp morning air touching his face.  Life is good for him.  He is at peace in his world.

He lifts from his swing and looks around his yard.  It is a park, so the neighbors have said.  It’s full of birds and bird songs.  The Blue jays don’t make good neighbors, but he lets their aggressiveness just roll off his back.  No need to get his feathers up and let them bother his perfect world.  He ignores their cries and squawks, and finds some satisfaction when the crows begin their morning routine that certainly shuts the blue jays up.

He looks down the manicured lawn and up into the trees, and sees two squirrels playing tag up and down the old tree trunks.  He has often wondered where they get their playfulness from.  They are his best entertainment, and they always start his day with a smile or a giggle as they scramble from limb to limb.  Yes, they are fine creatures with their  bushy tails and streamlined bodies. He recalls the day he saw a young squirrel  taking a sun bath on the roof of the garage spread out on his back, just enjoying the sun and the quietness of the yard.  Even squirrels have their Zen moments, he pondered.

Life is certainly good for Willy Sparrow.  He lives in a kaleidoscope of color, sound and smells.  He is grateful to be part of this wonder and grace that he lives in. As he reflects on life’s bounties, he hears the house door slam.  It’s her- in a frenzy again.  In and out of the house she goes.  She always forgets something.  He hears her mutter words he doesn’t understand, but he can feel that she isn’t too happy with the way her day is starting.  He watches her in amusement as she drops something to the ground.  “Shit”, she says.  He hears her say that a lot.  It’s part of her morning routine.  She opens the car door and slams it with such force the glass shakes.  In his observance of her and the car, he thinks,  she must feed the car something it’s not too fond of, because it makes the same groan and moan every morning she leaves.  Oh dear, this is a bad day for her.  The car’s tires squeal as she pulls out of the driveway.  He turns his head away from the chaos, and feels a sadness for her, but quickly returns to his routine of joy in the morning and just living in the moment.

This little story demonstrates how simple life can be if we just live in the moment and appreciate what is around us.  Like Willy Sparrow, I have been working on that everyday, and I think I am finally getting it.  When my husband and I first separated, just living in our house, working in our yard, filled me with such pain and anxiety, I had to move out of “our space” and find a space that didn’t hurt so much.  For a year I lived in apartments– two of them– to find myself again.  My journey to flee the hurt was necessary at the time, and it did heal me inside.  Now I am back in my house and I have made it my own.  It’s not “our” house anymore, and I am finding such joy in it again.  “Our” yard that had given me so much pleasure with my husband, has now served to heal me as I work in the dirt, and care for the plants.  I am now more aware, more grateful for the blessings given to me.

We all need to do what we have to do.  There may be regrets and sorrows, but if you find a space, you will find the peace. I think of the two ducks who come back to my yard every spring.  They could live anywhere, but they choose to live in a busy subdivision and in a yard where there is beauty. There are the loud sounds of planes and traffic, but they are happy swimming around or walking side by side, despite their surroundings. They have It! It’s not where one lives, but how one lives.  Take pleasure in your blessings, no matter how small or insignificant they may seem.  Reach to the inside and pull out the love that is now inside you.  No one is a loser– that’s the ego talking.  No one is alone– that’s the ego talking again.  Just listen. Be like the ducks or Willy Sparrow.  Relish in the small things, the blessings.  The more you find to be grateful for, the more blessings you will receive.

How do you find your peace, your gratitude?  Please share your comments.

The Power is in You!

I don’t claim to be an expert in anything, or a relationship counselor,  as so many bloggers profess to be.  I read  many posts from very good writers, but where are their credentials to take the reins and tell people what they should, or should not do with their lives, their writing, their values of life and love?  I have recently read tons of blogs on authenticity– all taking from others ideas.  How authentic is that?  I write from heart, not from the pages of other bloggers and their “gifts” of insight and wisdom.  I don’t sell packages of promise to my readers.  I just write what I know, and what I feel, and hope that it may touch someone.

I am a people person.  I know people.  I have made it my business to know people.  For over thirty years I have worked with people who suffer from mental illness and or severe physical disabilities.  This is what I know.  This is what I love to do.  I have learned how to empower, but most importantly, I have learned to listen, to feel empathy, and to put my own judgements aside.  I am in awe of those I serve.  They are the experts.  They have learned how to be “authentic” : they have empowered me to look inside of myself.  Their gifts are invaluable to me.

I could site many examples of my clients and how they have overcome  obstacles you cannot imagine.  They have suffered years of abuse, been ostracised– cast out from their families and support systems, but yet, they still survive.  They know… they yearn for a normal life, a happy life, and they find it within themselves.  They take responsibility for their lives.

The journey I have taken in all these years with these people, will soon be coming to an end.  In retrospect, I see real authenticity they have achieved as they became successful in their lives despite the odds.  They didn’t need to read blogs, or race to the nearest book store for a book on self-growth.  They reached inside themselves.  They saw their own light– not one reflected off of a case worker, shrink, or me, for that matter.  They have come to the place that tells them that they are worth it, and they can overcome.  They see their value as human beings, and with that comes a peace I am still striving to reach.

I once asked one of my clients how she appears to be so happy, and she said, “I take time to listen.  I take time to look around me.  I take the time to be thankful.”  The power is in her.  She recognised it.  The power is in all of us.  We have our own light.  We have to take responsibility for our own happiness.  Whatever that thing is that shows us the way, we all have it.  It’s there for the taking.  All we have to do is be silent, and listen.  When we do that, we know who our authentic self is.  We don’t need books and tapes, or expensive programs to find out who we are.  Sit, observe the present, and look inside, and just release and let go!

Listen to Your Voice and Be Aware

“We don’t receive wisdom; we must discover it for ourselves.”— Marcel Proust

I admit it. I still miss him. I probably always will, but I don’t see that as a bad thing.  I do know that all the good that is in him I will look for in another man, and all the bad in him I will avoid like the plague.  I learned a lot from his being gone. I learned about being me. I learned what I want and don’t want in a relationship. I learned that I can survive without him in my life, albeit that was a battle I fought for a long time. I learned to surrender my situation to the universe and just let go of the what if’s and could have beens.  As I said in my previous post, being alone has rendered me my own salvation.  I have had to learn so many things– especially making good decisions in several areas of my life.

Emotional and Rational Decision Making

Every choice in life is a battle between the rational and emotional way of thinking and feeling.  In most cases our ego is the little voice in our heads that tell us what to do.  Sometimes its good to listen to that inner voice, but other times, for example, when we listen to that ego tell us, “Buy the shoes, forget the electric bill” our rational thinking must kick in.  Ouch!  That isn’t always the fun thing to do, but it is the best decision for the moment.  An emotional decision can create al response within us we may regret later.

Examples of Negative Emotional Decisions

  • Bad relationships– Wow, the guy was cute, but what a jerk!  Use your own past experience in relationships to guide you to form good , healthy relationships.  This isn’t easy to do.  We all seem to return back to what we are used to, but remind yourself why he was a jerk and what he did to cause you pain and suffering and then just let him go! It’s never too late to look for a better “Mr. Right.”
  • Poor Spending Decisions– Oh the ego loves this one.  The ego wants to feel loved or justified in spending to make itself feel better.  Be wise about this.  Take time to make rational decisions.  Impulse buyers or compulsive buyers, gamblers or examples of falling into this emotional trap.
  • Instant self-gratification– We are all subject to this type of behavior.  Sometimes it can be good to “just let go” as long as it doesn’t affect negatively in an area of your life that can’t afford to take a beating.

I know as you read this you are thinking that’s a bit over-simplified, and perhaps it is, but I have also learned that I have to be more aware of the moment, and how the decision I am making can affect me this afternoon or tomorrow or in the future.  I am not saying that every decision should be weighed and measured, but using your past experience as a guideline to good decision making can make your life a lot easier.  Remember the best decisions make you feel better- not just for the moment, but in the long term.   

So What Can We Do to Help Ourselves  Reach Good  Choices?

Know your goal!   Too many choices aren’t good.   Eliminate so many choices that can confuse, but think about the choices that you can or will use. Take your time, and don’t use a bad mood or a stressful situation make the decision for you.  That’s your ego talking.  Wake up and be aware.    Listen to yourself, your ego.  Ask if  it is  hurting you or helping you to make a rational decision. According to Barry Schwartz, PhD., a psychologist and professor of social theory at Swarthmore College, and the author The Paradox Choice, he says,” To improve the odds of reaching decisions we feel good about, we need to reduce the options to a more manageable number.”   Goal setting is important to reaching good decisions.  Be aware of how your reaching your goal makes you feel, and use it for future decision making.

I’m not trying to judge, or lecture, but give some helpful tips for those of us , including myself , to make good choices.  I am still learning, and I hope to always learn to be more aware of me and what my needs are and the best way to achieve them.  Now my little voice in my head is saying,  go out to lunch, let me check my wallet!


Keep on Rockin’ and Empower Yourself